Dealing with difficult patients in the

Resolution Strategies for Aggressive Patients Speak softly and refrain from having a judgemental attitude Try to remain neutral, although it may be difficult with an irrational patient Put some distance between yourself and the patient, and do not make intense eye contact.

When you see these signs, try to uncover the source of difficulty for the patient and pay attention to the way his or her emotions relate to the medical issues at hand. Although easier said than done, saying no can avoid such needless travesties.

I have another strategy to suggest that has worked well for patients of mine in similar situations. This model is an educational device that posits that doctor—patient encounters generally involve three separate, occasionally overlapping, functional domains: I"m Doctor Cohen-Cole from the psychiatry service.

This expression of understanding and legitimation of the patient's emotion is extremely reassuring to the patient. Homes, ChicagoStyle Weddings, and a bi-weekly blog in Unigo. We can then decide together on the next step to take with respect to your stomach pain.

In most difficult-patient situations, however, doctors do not automatically think about commenting on what the patient is doing well. Once again, as was demonstrated in the case of patient anger, a few operationally defined communication skills can successfully help a patient cope with difficult emotions.

As exemplified in the case discussed above, effective doctor responses to an angry patient can be made by straightforward statements. We offer some management suggestions that should help the doctor improve the doctor—patient relationship Dealing with difficult patients in the encourage more adaptive patient reactions.

Some nurses may feel that they have personally failed when a patient acts out against them.

Health Care 101: Dealing With Your Difficult Patient

All our tests show that you do not have any serious or life-threatening physical problem. It's also not easy to talk about your feelings in this way, and your ability to discuss how you"re thinking and feeling will be of enormous help to us in planning for your care. Then there is the patient who has boundary issues, or drug abuse issues, or anger issues, or hygiene issues, or you name it.

You do things over and over again. I certainly would avoid any dishonest statements of pseudounderstanding.

Thus, when a patient becomes angry, anxious, or sad, a physician might be tempted to ask, "Why are you so angry anxious or sad? And when you do that, your body language realigns.

Don't get drawn into a conflict. Thus, when a patient becomes angry, anxious, or sad, a physician might be tempted to ask, "Why are you so angry anxious or sad? If something significant develops that has not already been worked up, we will do more tests.

Other examples include patients who do not receive as much analgesia as they want, or who are not given the respect they want or the services e. Help grieving patients by validating their emotional experience and making sure they understand that grief is a process that takes varying degrees of time for different people.

Cool your facial expression to keep from grimacing, twisting your lips, pursing your lips, lifting your eyebrows, or scowling.

Reflection The first, and most important, intervention in dealing with the emotions of a difficult patient is reflection. He was crying, anxious, and in pain. Once the doctor has pointed out that he can understand why the patient seems so angry, the patient usually will not stay angry.

A classic case that illustrates this point is when a physician submits to a demanding patient by administering a much higher dose of opiate pain medication than recommended, ultimately causing the patient to go into respiratory depression hypoventilation and necessitating emergent assisted breathing and immediate transfer to the intensive care unit.

If you sense that a patient is fearful about a diagnosis or treatment, encourage the patient to talk about it, and assess whether the fear is appropriate in proportion to the situation. The type of comment follows S or P in square brackets. Once again, it can be seen how straightforward operationally defined statements can be effectively used to help patients with sad feelings, just as with angry or anxious feelings.

Once again, as was demonstrated in the case of patient anger, a few operationally defined communication skills can successfully help a patient cope with difficult emotions. She became furious when her doctor asked her permission to request a psychiatric consultation, saying, You really don"t believe I have this pain.

Listen attentively to the patient and address their concerns.

10 Tips For Dealing with Difficult Patients

Let me try to explain my thinking and see if it makes any sense to you. For instance, maybe an older woman lashed out at you, and now you feel that all older women are going to be difficult. You have to first calm yourself and take stock of your own emotions.

Try following this rule of thumb: All of these will be read by the patient as a sign of dishonesty. Can the primary care physician be better trained in the psychosocial aspects of patient care?

I feel like it's my fault. Leigh H, Reiser MF, eds.The difficult patient is often trying to tell you that they are currently living a difficult life.

They may lack trust in healthcare as a whole, feel mistreated or ignored, have personality problems, social or. Dealing with difficult patients is never fun, but it doesn’t have to stop you from enjoying your rewarding nursing career thanks to these expert tips.

As a nurse, you’ll have the rewarding opportunity to work with patients from all walks of life. Those 'Difficult' Patients Whom You and Your Staff Dread. You know who they are: patients who are angry, disrespectful, and rude; patients who demand specific drugs or tests, even when they're.

How to Manage Difficult Patient Encounters along with strategies for dealing with them. In this model, patient characteristics, physician characteristics and situational characteristics all. No physician can avoid the difficult clinical encounter, but having the tools to deal with these situations when they arise can make for a better experience for both you and your patient.

Read the. Dealing with difficult patients is never fun, but it doesn’t have to stop you from enjoying your rewarding nursing career thanks to these expert tips. As a nurse, you’ll have the rewarding opportunity to work with patients from all walks of life.

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